Bald Eagle Sighting In Burton On My “Wildlife Loop”!

If you read my story this morning, you know about the “Wildlife Loop” I frequently drive. If you haven’t read it yet, here is the link.  Go take a look then come back to read this.

On my way to work Wednesday morning, I decided to drive part of my “Wildlife Loop” to see what types of animals I would see that day.  With my camera in hand and my windows rolled down, I slowly drove down the dirt road past Burton Wetlands.  I stopped by the beaver pond to listen to the spring peepers and all of birds of that crisp, cool morning.

I rounded the corner on Pond Road where Lake Kelso  is frequently dammed up by the beavers. I stopped to see if there were any ducks, geese, or beavers in the water.  Once, I saw some baby beavers chomping on some brush growing near the pipe that goes under the road.  Today, a pair of mallards took flight as I pulled up, apparently startled by my Jeep.

mallards taking flight

As I scanned the horizon, I spotted a bald eagle in the distance sitting on a branch of a dead tree. I was SO EXCITED! I continued to slowly drive down the dirt road until I got a better view of this beautiful bird of prey. I found a good spot without trees and branches blocking my view. I snapped a few shots, and by a few, I actually mean about 25 shots!

bald eagle

bald eagle

bald eagle

I sat in my car, with my binoculars, just watching! I had a feeling that morning that I would see something great on the drive that I take so often. I WAS RIGHT! Just as I was about to say farewell and continue on my way to work, the eagle swooped down to catch a fish in Fern Lake, which is owned by the Natural History Museum in Cleveland, then flew back to where I had been when I originally spotted the eagle, and landed in a tree near the road. So, I turned around and headed back that way. I made one pass, did not see the eagle, so I turned back around, utterly disappointed.

As I rounded that corner again, I saw it just ahead on the left side of the road up in the branches.

bald eagle

I cautiously pulled closer toward that tree, camera in hand in case it decided I was getting too close and flew away. I stopped about 50 feet from the tree, and started shooting (photos, of course). I probably took another 20 shots of this magnificent bird. It did not seem to mind my presence.

bald eagle

bald eagle

bald eagle

bald eagle

bald eagle

bald eagle

bald eagle

After watching the eagle for about 15 minutes, I decided that I probably needed to get to work. So, I turned on the video camera, and started to drive away, completely expecting the bird to fly away as I got closer. But to my surprise, it stayed on that branch, and I found an even better spot to stop and take a few more pictures.

 

2EUfmdStOs4

2EUfmdStOs4

So, I put my Jeep in park and sat for just a few more minutes. I thought to myself, this bird really needs to fly away or I am never going to work. Just then, it started to downpour. The eagle took flight back out to the tree it was sitting in when I first saw it.

bald eagle
Bald eagle taking flight in a sudden downpour

If only I had left the video camera going for another minute, I would have caught the take off in the rain. But I am happy with the time I shared with that amazing animal that morning. I said farewell and continued on my  “Wildlife Loop” and went to work.  I did spot the Sandhill Cranes on Rapids Road that morning as well.  But I think I may save those photos for another article.

Take a look at all of the features that I have written about our amazing parks in Geauga County. Click here.

As I always say…

“Take a hike, bring your binoculars and your camera, and enjoy what nature has to offer.”

Please leave comments below about any experiences you have had with bald eagles in Geauga County. 

Geauga News
Author: Geauga News